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2012 Predictions For Mobile & UI Design

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Interactive Design—

Designing a mobile interface that smoothly integrates a native mobile feature, (like a built-in camera,) is a skill that can take user experience to the next level.  Apps like Yelp, Overstock, and RayBan have already introduced mobile users to “augmented reality” through a mobile UI.  2012 will likely usher in the more frequent use of A.R. features in mobile apps, making interactive design a growing component of UX.

You can also expect to see more apps designed to integrate gestures into their primary navigation in 2012—designing for a touch, drag, flick, tap, or two-fingered swipe will require a uniquely different approach to UI

More Animation– 

2012 forecasts improved technology and more frequent use of HTML5, JQuery, CSS3.  Instead of a simple roll over state, we’ll likely see more rich interactive animals on the web in 2012.

Flexible Design—

Flexible design will be super-relevant in 2012. With the growth of more devices & browsers will come the increased demand for mobile/desktop designs that render a consistent, quality UX across platforms.  Fluid layouts will move from theory to majority practice in 2012, and become a standard website feature. User interface designs that work well with a mouse click or a finger tap will stand to be both popular and practical. Traditional desktop design elements like the scroll bar will be phased out because of their inability to deliver an integrated & flexible UX on mobile devices.

Mobile Influences—

2012 brings with it the most progressive mobile UIs to-date—streamlined, highly usable mobile interfaces that have full-feature functionality. Apps give mobile users direct access to essential tasks & actions through a fast and friendly UI.  Mobile apps are explicitly designed to let the user do more with fewer actions/steps.  We can expect to see more websites adopt this stripped-down, action-driven approach in 2012, inspired by “mobile-first” UI.

Author Alex Stetson

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